Could more stress actually lead to a better life?

90
stress management stress science motivation
Image supplied by ShutterStock.

Psychologists and researchers have, for the past few decades, been exploring the impact of stress on our daily lives and how it affects our happiness, our motivation and our health.

But according to some not all stress is created equal.

More accurately, not everyone has the same response to stress.

Known as eustress (good stress) and distress (bad stress), the way you respond and interpret stress seems to be rooted in your own past experiences, beliefs, and awareness.

In a recent article posted on the online news site News.com.au, Dr. Christen Brown explains:

While 33 per cent per cent of us report being really stressed globally, research shows that the higher the stress index of a particular country, the higher the reported levels of wellbeing, life expectancy, satisfaction levels and even the GDP. This is exactly the opposite of what we are led to believe.

The key is how we interpret stress. If we view stress as something negative to be avoided, we suffer. If we view stress as something positive to be embraced, we flourish. It turns out that instead of feeling inadequate in the face of anxiety and sadness, these stress emotions are a sign that we are striving to reach our goals.

The takeaway is that more than an effective way to reduce the negative impact of stress, regular meditation and mindfulness exercises could actually help you transform it into a powerful tool to improve your life.

You can read more about the research behind these statements by following this link to the original story.

FREE PRESENTATION REVEALS...
WHAT IF EVERYTHING YOU KNEW ABOUT HAPPINESS WAS WRONG?
Discover the shocking reason why most people never find true happiness and how a simple shift can improve your health, your career and your relationships almost overnight.
Yes! Take Me To It Now!
SHARE
Ben Baker is the communication officer and content editor for the team here at Science of Zen. His interest in personal growth topics range from mindfulness, meditation, neuroscience, performance psychology and natural health.